The Other Side

One of the great things about the hospital environment is that there is always a problem that needs to be solved and we love to get together and talk about them.

My colleagues are all telling the same story; their facilities are doing everything they can to drive cost out of their operations.

I recently attended an annual meeting with the hospital’s senior leadership to review our program and talk about the future. It was no surprise that cost reduction dominated most of the discussion.

When I reflect on this past year I feel like it was not quite as tumultuous as some previous years. However, as I look to the future, I see a very big and expensive issue on the horizon.

The life of a biomedical engineer is full of challenges and issues that seem to sap our time and energy. It is easy in the flurry of government regulations, Joint Commission compliance and battling OEMs to lose sight of our primary focus – the patient.

I am a firm believer that building strong partnerships with the people I regularly do business with ensures that I always receive the best possible customer service and value.

One of the great values a good Biomed program brings is the ability to keep equipment running long after the manufacturer deems it obsolete.

At my facility medical equipment integration to our patients’ EMR has been growing exponentially over the past couple of years. The integration capability of medical equipment is now part of the evaluation process for any purchase.

My facility recently went through the process of purchasing two new lasers for urology surgery. The good news was involved on the front end as we were able to ensure our expectations on service issues were addressed satisfactorily. However, today I found out that we have come up short once again.

At my facility, it is time to review staff performance and development plans. I find technicians to be difficult to convince they need to follow the general protocols of talent management and be active in their development. Frankly, some days I feel like beating my head against the wall.

One of the great things about the hospital environment is that there is always a problem that needs to be solved and we love to get together and talk about them.

My colleagues are all telling the same story; their facilities are doing everything they can to drive cost out of their operations.

I recently attended an annual meeting with the hospital’s senior leadership to review our program and talk about the future. It was no surprise that cost reduction dominated most of the discussion.

When I reflect on this past year I feel like it was not quite as tumultuous as some previous years. However, as I look to the future, I see a very big and expensive issue on the horizon.

The life of a biomedical engineer is full of challenges and issues that seem to sap our time and energy. It is easy in the flurry of government regulations, Joint Commission compliance and battling OEMs to lose sight of our primary focus – the patient.

I am a firm believer that building strong partnerships with the people I regularly do business with ensures that I always receive the best possible customer service and value.

One of the great values a good Biomed program brings is the ability to keep equipment running long after the manufacturer deems it obsolete.

At my facility medical equipment integration to our patients’ EMR has been growing exponentially over the past couple of years. The integration capability of medical equipment is now part of the evaluation process for any purchase.

My facility recently went through the process of purchasing two new lasers for urology surgery. The good news was involved on the front end as we were able to ensure our expectations on service issues were addressed satisfactorily. However, today I found out that we have come up short once again.

At my facility, it is time to review staff performance and development plans. I find technicians to be difficult to convince they need to follow the general protocols of talent management and be active in their development. Frankly, some days I feel like beating my head against the wall.